On a hill far away stood an old rugged cross, The emblem of suffering and shame; And I love that old cross where the dearest and best For a
world of lost sinners was slain.


So I’ll cherish the old rugged cross, Till my trophies at last I lay down; I will cling to the old rugged cross, And exchange it some day for a crown.


Oh, that old rugged cross, so despised by the world, Has a wondrous attraction for me; For the dear Lamb of God left His glory above To
bear it to dark Calvary.


So I’ll cherish the old rugged cross, Till my trophies at last I lay down; I will cling to the old rugged cross, And exchange it some day for a crown.


In that old rugged cross, stained with blood so divine, A wondrous beauty I see, For ’twas on that old cross Jesus suffered and died, To pardon and sanctify me.


So I’ll cherish the old rugged cross, Till my trophies at last I lay down; I will cling to the old rugged cross, And exchange it some day for a crown.


To the old rugged cross I will ever be true; Its shame and reproach gladly bear; Then He’ll call me some day to my home far away, Where
His glory forever I’ll share.

Death and Dying

When people are faced with a terminally ill disease they often go through the five stages of grieve. These stages were documented by Elizabeth Kubler-Ross in 1969. Not all patients or family members will go through these stages, nor will they go in order, but they are helpful to know when one is faced with a patient going through the grieving process.

1.   Denial:
 This is a conscious or unconscious refusal to accept the facts, information, reality, ect., relating to the situation concerned. It’s a defense mechanism and perfectly natural. Some people can become locked in this stage when dealing with a traumatic change that can be ignored. Death of course is not particularly easy to avoid or evade indefinitely.

2.   Anger:
 This can manifest in different ways. People dealing with emotional upset can be angry with themselves, and/or others, especially those close to them. Knowing this helps keep detached and non-judgmental when experiencing the anger of someone who is very upset.

3.  Bargaining:
 Traditionally the bargaining stage for people facing death can involve attempting to bargain with whatever God the person believes in. People facing less serious trauma can bargain or seek to negotiate a compromise. For example “Can we still be friends?..” when facing a break-up. Bargaining rarely provides a sustainable solution, especially if it’s a matter of life and death.

4.  Depression: 
This is also referred to as preparatory grieving. In a way it’s the dress rehearsal or the practice run for the ‘aftermath’ although this stage means different things depending on whom it involves. It’s natural to feel sadness and regret, fear, uncertainty, ect. It shows that the person has at least begun to accept the reality.

5.  Acceptance: 
Again this stage definitely varies according to the person‘s situation, although broadly it is an indication that there is some emotional detachment and objectivity. People dying can enter this stage a long time before the people they leave behind, who must necessarily pass through their own individual stages of dealing with grief.